Tag Archives: kindness

Kindness Always

One Million Acts Of Kindness is a goal. A goal for each person to individually perform One Million Acts Of Kindness in their life. Can you imagine a greater goal for one’s life? It is a constant mind-set of kindness every day of your life for the next fifty-five years. Doing for others and kindness in your heart for everyone. It is my wish that you will dedicate your life to a charity… finding the passion in your heart for something or someone in need.

onemillionacts

As a father of three college age kids I am concerned for the world in which all kids will live. A great way to create a safer, more caring world is for everyone to start their lifetime goal of One Million Acts Of Kindness. So I bought a bus, had about sixty family members, friends and neighbors help paint it and began a ten year journey with my Boston Terrier, Bogart, to college campuses across the country hoping to convince as many of you as possible about this much needed movement for this world. I love you guys too much to sit back and not do anything about this. Let’s start a kindness movement in this country today to change the direction this world is headed!! You are the change that this world needs.
—  Bob Votruba, http://www.onemillionactsofkindness.com/

Learn more about this amazing man and his journey at our Mental Health & Happiness Summit, October 10th.


Register

Unexpected Kindness

By Nancy S Buck, PhD, RN

Unexpected kindness is the most powerful, least costly, and most under-rated agent of human change; kindness that catches us by surprise bringing out the best in our natures.                                                                                                                        Bob Kerry

A brilliant friend of mine who is the mother of an amazing 6-year old daughter has started a family tradition. Every December they, along with 7 other families, put together and give away blessing bags for the homeless. Here is how she describes it

“Every family brings 30 items.  Then we have a party. We lay it all out and everyone makes their bags from the items everyone bought. It’s fun and the kids get to talk to each other about what it was like when they got to hand out bags. I also read two books to them about being homeless. It was a great way to explain homelessness to our young children. We talk about how some problems we can’t solve but we can still make a difference in the lives of some people who are struggling.  You can make a difference no matter your age or size.

canstockphoto0190342“Here in Rhode Island we see a a lot of homeless people at intersections who are holding signs. Before we started this project our kids would ask about these folks and of course were upset to learn some people don’t have homes. This is especially distressing during our cold winters. Our children would ask a lot of good questions about it. We parents felt it was important to help our children feel more empowered to help.

 

“I saw a pin on Pinterest about this project so organized the 7 families to make the blessing bags. One of the children suggested we add a little piece of art so people would have something beautiful to look at. All the children liked this idea. It feels more personal for the kids to add something they made.

“This project is something I am passionate about. In college I worked in a homeless shelter doing overnights. I can feel overwhelmed and hopeless about the problem of homelessness. But handing out these blessing bags, little gifts of comfort, also helps me!”

Here is what they put in their bags:

Hand warmers, socks, high protein snacks (larabars, peanut butter and cracker packs, beef jerky or tuna bags) fruit cups, toothbrushes, toothpaste and floss donated from dental professionals, leftover Halloween candy from the children, a picture drawn by a child, and printed brochures of the local shelters listed, as well as places to get hot meals, and food pantries. We also make a few bags that have sanitary pads and tampons for the women we see.

Caring for others is consistently listed as a practice to improve Mental Health & Happiness. Perhaps this mother and daughter team can inspire your own act of kindness that will not only help the life of someone else, it will also improve your own Mental Health & Happiness.*

*Thank you Amanda and Willow Campbell for telling me your story and inspiring this blog.

Gratitude, the gift you give yourself

Contributed by Denise Daub

How Gratitude Can Benefit Your Physical Health All Year Long

by Lindsay Holmes Healthy Living Editor, The Huffington Post

canstockphoto2744335Now that we’re officially in the holiday season, generosity and gratitude reign supreme. We’re altruistic because we’re motivated at this time of year to support others who are less fortunate, and we express thanks for those who have extended similar kindness to us.

And honestly, why wouldn’t we want to tap into this sort of holiday spirit? Both generosity and gratitude have an incredible influence on our emotional health. When we practice them, we’re happier, more optimistic and have a lower risk for depression and anxiety. New research also shows that gift giving reflects how we feel about others and could give more insight into how we maintain relationships.

Yet, somehow, we really only concentrate on the benefits when the year winds down. Bah-humbug.

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/gratitude-benefits-physical-health_56538058e4b0879a5b0c1464?ir=Healthy%2BLiving%253Fncid%253Dnewsltushpmg00000003

Random Acts of Kindness

By Dr. Ken Larsen

  I used to carry a card in my wallet that had two messages.

One was something attributed to Lincoln sayinghappypeople that people are as happy as they make up their minds to be.

The second was encouragement to do something nice for someone and don’t get caught.

Occasionally I encounter exceptional service in a store or office.  I like to write letters to that person’s superior, telling of my very positive experience.  One lady traced me down and told me that my letter had been part of the reason she got a major promotion.

I like to look for heartwarming smiles.  First I like to smile back, and then I like to tell the other person how pleasant they look.

That was reversed on me recently.  I was in the Dallas airport going through the security line.  One lmartinlutherkingady directed me to another line.  She was pleasant, not surly.  I smiled at her.  She looked at me and said, “with that smile darlin…” and she went on to make a lightly flirtatious comment.  I have to admit that I smiled on the inside, too. J

I don’t like to focus on physical appearance or clothing because that can be seen as flattery, which I want to avoid.  That’s why I like the word “heartwarming”.  Something that sends a message of life and goodness is worth recognizing.

Of course the takeaway message here is that what you give in love and kindness you get back.  So let’s give a bunch today.motherteresa

Be Kind to Yourself

Contributed by Denise Daub

When You Treat Yourself With a Little More Kindness, These 6 Things Will Happen by 

Do you ever call yourself names? Do you replay your mistakes in your head over and over again? If so, you’re not alone. Harsh self-criticism is pretty common.

But beating yourself up for your mistakes and punishing yourself for your failures could backfire. Being too tough on yourself may actually hinder your performance. Multiple studies show that treating yourself with more kindness could be the best way to gain better results.

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/amy-morin/kindness_b_8244822.html?ir=Healthy%20Living?ncid=newsltushpmg00000003

“But I’ve never cared for the sound of being alone.”

Dr. Ken Larsen

I recently saw a post on Facebook suggesting an unpopular response to the senseless acts of violence that punch their way into our world.  The clamor of “someone should do something”, can be turned into “what can I do?” 

When we see someone alone and friendless, what can we do to reach out with kindness and compassion?  Neil Diamond’s lament seems relevant to the loneliness and isolation experienced by so many in our world today.

“I am, I said

To no one there

And no one heard at all

Not even the chair.

I am, I cried

I am, said I

And I am lost, and I can’t even say why

Leavin’ me lonely still.” *

indifferenceI think many of us can recognize the emptiness expressed in these words because we’ve felt it ourselves.  I know I have.  Finding our way to mental health and happiness is enhanced when we find a way to reach out to the other when we see this loneliness.  This requires us to look at the misery in our fellow humans rather than look away.  And then, once seen, we can respond with something as simple as a smile, a kind word…anything that gives the other the gift and experience of being seen with kindness rather than indifference.

https://youtu.be/sxDyXK93o6g

 

What are your character strengths?

Contributed by Denise Daub

By Rebecca Scholl

Honing in on your strengths — whether its expressing kindness, gratitude or honesty — can improve your daily life. Being kind to others can actually boost your cardiovascular health. Expressing gratitude has been linked to more optimism. Being honest may improve your overall health.

Happify, a website dedicated to helping people build skills for happiness through science-based activities and games, organized a detailed infographic explaining how you can use your personal character strengths to improve your own life. Take a look at it below and get inspired to tap into what makes you unique.

Read more…http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/how-to-use-your-character-strengths-to-improve-your-life_55ae5a35e4b07af29d5656eb?ncid=newsltushpmg00000003

Kindness

By Nancy S Buck, PhD, RN

Kindness is a language which the dumb can speak, the deaf can understand C.N. Bone

Today Im feeling overwhelmed. The news tells us of an angry man who states he was not raised by racists, but independently found answers on the Internet that led him to believe killing people because of the color of their skin was the answer to the worlds troubles. Perhaps it is reasonable to surmise that he believed this would be the answer to his own personal troubles.

Almost immediately the news tells us that family members of the slain nine who prayed with this young man before he shot them in cold blood have forgiven this man. This is such an extraordinary act of love and kindness that it is beyond my imagining.

What follows this act are the same arguments in todays news headlines, just are they have been so often:

People cry out for gun control!

We need more focus on mental health issues! (Please read this as mental illness, not mental health.)

If the people had carried guns in church this never would have happened.

What do you mean we have race relations troubles? This was an isolated case!

Amazingly there has also been swift action in many southern states. The confederate flag is being removed from public and government office buildings and spaces. Even Walmart is removing the sale of products that display this flag.

One small step. Years and years and years for this action to become a reality.

Could it be that this is an act of kindness? Is it possible that some are changing their opinions and points of view?

My own personal solution, the strategy I turn to for help with my personal Mental Health & Happiness right now is to search for and discover all the many acts of love and kindness committed by many people. My search includes the citizens of South Carolina as well as in my own city. There are people I meet and greet daily who are loving and kind toward me and others.

My challenge is to regularly commit acts of love and kindness. When others are looking to see where there are people committing acts of love and kindness, not acts of hate and terror, I want to be one of the people they discover. I want to help spread more love and kindness in the world.

For me, love and kindness are the answers to the worlds troubles. For me, love and kindness are the answers to my own troubles. For me, love and kindness are the direct path to Mental Health & Happiness.

Random Acts of Kindness

By Nancy S Buck, PhD, RN

How often do you do kind things for others? There was a time when committing random acts of kindness was all the rage.

You might come to a toll booth and discover that the driver in front of you had already paid for you. It wouldn’t be too unusual to purchase a cup of coffee only to discover that a stranger had paid for your coffee too. Even today you may experience good fortune if someone with a carriage filled with groceries will let you go first to pay for your three articles.

Not long ago there was a television commercial showing one person observing another person who was being kind and thoughtful. This inspired similar action by the observer who then was observed in kindness by another. And so the chain reaction of spreading kindness was demonstrated. I don’t remember the advertised product. But I was buying the random acts of kindness that was also being sold.

maninholeKindness can be contagious. And kindness feels good when you give or receive it. Somehow it feels like even more of a gift when the person extending this is a complete stranger! How awesome to discover that another person sharing the planet with you enjoys his or her ability to be generous!

If today is a day where you feel that our world is more and more disconnected, angry, alienated and cruel then today would be a great day for you to spread some random acts of kindness. Your Mental Health & Happiness will be enhanced if you do.

And if you are looking for some help and ideas, please visit www.randomactsofkindness.org. Just visiting this site is guaranteed to improve your Mental Health & Happiness.

KEY WORDS:

Kindness

By Nancy S Buck, PhD, RN

Unexpected kindness is the most powerful, least costly, and most under-rated agent of human change; kindness that catches us by surprise bringing out the best in our natures.                                                                                                                        Bob Kerry

A brilliant friend of mine who is the mother of an amazing 6-year old daughter has started a family tradition. Every December they, along with 7 other families, put together and give away blessing bags for the homeless. Here is how she describes it

“Every family brings 30 items.  Then we have a party. We lay it all out and everyone makes their bags from the items everyone bought. It’s fun and the kids get to talk to each other about what it was like when they got to hand out bags. I also read two books to them about being homeless. It was a great way to explain homelessness to our young children. We talk about how some problems we can’t solve but we can still make a difference in the lives of some people who are struggling.  You can make a difference no matter your age or size.

canstockphoto0190342“Here in Rhode Island we see a a lot of homeless people at intersections who are holding signs. Before we started this project our kids would ask about these folks and of course were upset to learn some people don’t have homes. This is especially distressing during our cold winters. Our children would ask a lot of good questions about it. We parents felt it was important to help our children feel more empowered to help.

“I saw a pin on Pinterest about this project so organized the 7 families to make the blessing bags. One of the children suggested we add a little piece of art so people would have something beautiful to look at. All the children liked this idea. It feels more personal for the kids to add something they made.

“This project is something I am passionate about. In college I worked in a homeless shelter doing overnights. I can feel overwhelmed and hopeless about the problem of homelessness. But handing out these blessing bags, little gifts of comfort, also helps me!”

Here is what they put in their bags:

Hand warmers, socks, high protein snacks (larabars, peanut butter and cracker packs, beef jerky or tuna bags) fruit cups, toothbrushes, toothpaste and floss donated from dental professionals, leftover Halloween candy from the children, a picture drawn by a child, and printed brochures of the local shelters listed, as well as places to get hot meals, and food pantries. We also make a few bags that have sanitary pads and tampons for the women we see.

Caring for others is consistently listed as a practice to improve Mental Health & Happiness. Perhaps this mother and daughter team can inspire your own act of kindness that will not only help the life of someone else, it will also improve your own Mental Health & Happiness.*

*Thank you Amanda and Willow Campbell for telling me your story and inspiring this blog.